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The Constitution in Congress: Democrats and Whigs, 1829-1861

The Constitution in Congress: Democrats and Whigs, 1829-1861

Law of America > Law of the United States > Federal law. Common and collective state law Individual states > Constitutional law > Constitutional history of the United States > General

Edition Details

  • Creator or Attribution (Responsibility): David P. Currie
  • Biografical Information: David P. Currie is the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago. He is the author of the two previous volumes in The Constitution in Congress series and the award-winning two-volume history, The Constitution in the Supreme Court, all published by the University of Chicago Press.
  • Language: English
  • Jurisdiction(s): Illinois
  • Publication Information: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2005
  • Publication Type (Medium): History
  • Material: Internet resource
  • Type: Book, Internet Resource
  • Permalink: http://books.lawi.us/the-constitution-in-congress-democrats-and-whigs-1829-1861/ (Stable identifier)

Short Description

XXII, 346 pages ; 25 cm

Purpose and Intended Audience

Useful for students learning an area of law, The Constitution in Congress: Democrats and Whigs, 1829-1861 is also useful for lawyers seeking to apply the law to issues arising in practice.

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Bibliographic information

  • Responsable Person: David P. Currie.
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Country/State: Illinois
  • Number of Editions: 8 editions
  • First edition Date: 2005
  • Last edition Date: 2014
  • Languages: US English
  • Library of Congress Code: KF4541
  • Dewey Code: 342.73029
  • ISBN: 0226129004 9780226129006
  • OCLC: 56631957

Publisher Description:

This acclaimed series, which has been called a biography of the U.S. Constitution, continues its examination of the role that the legislative and executive branches have played in the development of constitutional interpretation. While legal scholars typically look to the courts for guidance in deciphering the Constitution, The Constitution in Congress offers an indispensable survey of the congressional history behind the development of the Constitution.
This third volume in David P. Currie's series, the early installments of which dealt with the Federalist period and the Jeffersonian era, now turns to the Jacksonian revolution of 1829 and the subsequent efforts by Democrats to dismantle Henry Clay's celebrated “American System” of nationalist economics. Currie covers the political events of the period leading up to the start of the Civil War, showing how the slavery question, although seldom overtly discussed in the debates included in this volume, underlay the Southern insistence on strict interpretation of federal powers.
Like its predecessors, The Constitution in Congress: Democrats and Whigs, 1829-1861 will be an invaluable reference for legal scholars and constitutional historians alike.

Main Contents

1: Death of a system
Intercourse
The public lands
The bank war
Customs
2: The kitchen sink
Enumerated and limited powers
President, VIce-president
All about judges
More miscreants
Judging congressional elections
Other election issues.

Table of Contents

Contents
PREFACE XI
ABBREVIATIONS AND SHORTENED TITLES XIX
Part One: Death of a System
INTRODUCTION TO PART ONE 3
CHAPTER 1: INTERCOURSE 9
I. The Maysville Road 10
II. Rivers and Harbors 13
III. Ebb Tide 16
IV. The Undelivered Veto 20
V. Congress Insists (A Little) 23
VI. Tonnage Duties 25
VII. The Iron Horse 28
VIII. The Golden Gate 31
IX. The Telegraph 34
CHAPTER 2: THE PUBLIC LANDS 37
I. The 1833 Distribution Bill 40
II. The 1841 Distribution Law 43
III. The Mad 46
IV. The Learned 50
V. The Footloose 53
CHAPTER 3: THE BANK WAR 58
I. President Jackson?s Veto 59
II. Removal of the Deposits 65
A. The Statute 65
B. The President?s Powers 67
C. Censure and Protest 71
D. Expungement 73
E. Ruminations 75
III. State Banks and State Treasuries 79
IV. And Tyler Too 83
CHAPTER 4: CUSTOMS 88
I. The South Carolina Exposition 89
II. The Hayne-Webster Debate 93
III. The Nullification Ordinance 99
IV. President Jackson?s Response 105
V. The Compromise of 1833 111
VI. Cadenza 117
Part Two: The Kitchen Sink
CHAPTER 5: ENUMERATED AND LIMITED POWERS
123
I. Admiralty and Commerce 123
II. The Broken Bench 126
III. The Smithsonian 136
IV. Retrocession 142
V. Prayers 143
VI. Spoils 149
CHAPTER 6: PRESIDENT, VICE-PRESIDENT 157
I. The Veto 157
A. The President?s Pocket 158
B. Tippecanoe 162
C. Mr. Tyler and the Bank 163
D. Mr. Clay?s Amendment 165
E. Mr. Tyler and the Tariff 168
F. Winding Down 171
II. The Appointing Power 174
III. The Sanctity of the Cabinet 176
IV. His Accidency 177
V. Casting Votes and Other Quiddities 181
CHAPTER 7: ALL ABOUT JUDGES 184
I. The Impeachment of Judge Peck 185
II. Another Who Got Away 189
III. The Wheeling Bridge 192
IV. The Court of Claims 194
V. Good Behavior 203
CHAPTER 8: MORE MISCREANTS 206
I. Sam Houston 206
II. Miss Otis Regrets 208
III. The Caning of Senator Sumner 212
IV. The Sins of Orsamus Matteson 219
V. Immunity 220
CHAPTER 9: JUDGING CONGRESSIONAL ELECTIONS
229
I. Threshold Questions 229
II. Vacancies 233
A. Mississippi 233
B. Kentucky 237
C. Vermont 241
III. The Three I?s 244
A. Illinois 244
B. Eligibility Encore 247
C. Indiana and Iowa 250
CHAPTER 10: OTHER ELECTION ISSUES 254
I. Districts 254
A. Time, Place, and Manner 256
B. Co-Opting the States 260
C. Undoing the Deed 265
II. The Speaker 268
III. The Snowstorm of 1856 273
CONCLUSION 278
APPENDIX A. DRAMATIS PERSONAE 281
APPENDIX B. PRINCIPAL OFFICERS, 1829?1861 303
APPENDIX C. THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED
STATES 311
INDEX 000

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  • Article Name: The Constitution in Congress: Democrats and Whigs, 1829-1861
  • Author: Larry Reames
  • Description: The Constitution in Congress: Democrats and Whigs, 1829-1861 Law of America > Law of the United States > Federal law. [...]

This entry was last updated: January 31, 2016

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